Curriculum

In our classrooms and across our campus:

A liberal arts approach to learning is the foundation of our curriculum. Our daily schedule of 75 minute classes that rotate over 2 days provides opportunities for in-depth exploration of literature, mathematics, science experimentation, or participation in the arts. The student load of coursework includes a total of seven credits for one academic year. See our 2018-2019 Curriculum Guide for a listing of all courses available at Chaminade-Madonna.

Our teachers approach planning in a holistic manner, using a backward-design model. This method targets critical thinking and problem-solving in all academic disciplines. Students are given a variety of opportunities to demonstrate mastery of learning which go well-beyond traditional written tests and quizzes.

For questions relating to the C-M Curriculum, please contact:

Mrs. Raiza Echemendia
Assistant Head of School
(954) 989-5150 ext. 104
rechemendia@cmlions.org

General Scheduling Information

When building the master schedule, every effort is made to arrange class sections in such a way that students will be able to get the courses they requested during registration.

Please keep in mind the following guidelines when you are selecting courses for next year:

1. Selection of your courses is serious; students should consult with parents, teachers, and their guidance counselor. Courses should be chosen with college and career goals in mind.

2. When a student does not receive their first choice course request, it is due to one or more of the following reasons:

a. students do not satisfy course prerequisites

b. the course section(s) is filled to capacity

c. two courses are scheduled at the same time

d. there are too few requests for the class

3. Alternative choices should be given the same consideration as a primary choice.

Graduation Requirements

Earn 28 credits as outlined below:

CREDITS

CURRICULUM AREAS

4.0

Theology

4.0

English

4.0

Mathematics

4.0

Social Studies

3.0

Science

2.0

Foreign Language (Consecutive years)

1.0

HOPE or Personal Fitness and Life Management

1.0

Fine Arts/Practical Arts

5.0

Electives


2. 100 hours of community service (25 hours completed each year enrolled at C-M)-(Class of 2020 onward)

3. Participation on Encounter Program

Grading Scale

A100-90
B89-80
C79-70
D69-60
F59-0


Honors & Advancement Placement Classes

Students in Honors classes must maintain a consistently good academic standing. Students in Honors classes who earn a grade of “C” or better are granted one additional quality point on the grading scale. Students in Advanced Placement classes who earn a grade of “C” or better are granted an additional two quality points on the grading scale.

Dual Enrollment Course Offerings

Sophomores/Juniors/Seniors at additional expense, may take the following courses for college credit through St. Thomas University: ($165 for 3 credit course and $220 for 4 credit courses)

AP Biology- 4 credits per semester

Honors/AP American Government- 3 credits

Honors/AP Economics- 3 credits

Honors/ AP English III- 3 credits per semester

Honors/AP English IV- 3 credits per semester

Honors Human Anatomy & Physiology- 4 credits per semester

Honors/AP US History- 3 credits per semester

Honors Marine Biology- 3 credits per semester

Honors Business- 3 credits

Honors Web Design- 3 credits

College Entrance Standards

Most Selective (Ivy League):
4 years math, science, and foreign language
Honors and Advanced Placement courses encouraged

Selective (Duke, Emory, Florida State University, Georgetown, Holy Cross, University of Dayton, Marquette, Notre Dame, BC, University of North Carolina, University of Florida):
4 years math and science
3-4 years foreign language

Honors and Advanced Placement courses encouraged

Less Selective:
3-4 years math and science
2-3 years foreign language

Florida Bright Futures Scholarship Program

Bright Futures Florida Academic Scholars Award

(About $12,000 over four years subject to change due to legislative funding decisions or $103 per credit hour) http://www.floridastudentfinancialaid.org/ssfad/PDF/BFHandbookChapter1.pdf

Required Credits

16 Credits

3.5 weighted GPA using only the credits listed below. GPAs are not rounded. Weighting is an additional 0.5 for honors or AP, i.e. A=4.5, B=3.5, etc. AP and honors credits are weighted equally for Bright Futures. Courses must include 16 credits of college preparatory academic courses as follows along with at least 100 hours of community service:
  • 4 English
  • 4 Mathematics (Algebra I level and above)
  • 3 Natural Science
  • 3 Social Science
  • 2 Foreign Language (sequential, in the same language)

If students have more credits than listed in any subject area, the Bright Futures Scholarship Program will count only the best semesters toward the GPA. However, you may use up to two additional credits from courses in the academic areas listed above and/or AP courses to raise the GPA.

Test ScoresBest combined score of 1290 SAT or best composite score of 29 ACT. The ACT composite score is the average of the best scores across the four subject area sections from any test sitting: English, Math, Reading and Science. Composite scores ending in 0.50 will be rounded up to the next whole number. The SAT is the best reading and math score from any sitting.Students may sit for either old or new versions of the SAT. Bright Futures will continue to use any combination of the two sections that will benefit the student.
  • The writing sections for both the SAT and ACT will not be used in the composite
  • Sections of the SAT or ACT from different test dates may be used to meet the test criteria
  • Test dates through June 30 of the senior year will be admissible


Bright Futures Florida Medallion Scholars (FMS) Award

(About $9,000 for four years subject to change due to legislative funding decisions or $77 per credit hour) http://www.floridastudentfinancialaid.org/ssfad/PDF/BFHandbookChapter1.pdf

Required

Credits

16 Credits

3.0 weighted GPA using only the credits listed below. GPAs are not rounded. Weighting is an additional 0.5 for honors or AP, i.e. A=4.5, B=3.5, etc. AP and honors credits are weighted equally for Bright Futures. Courses must include 16 credits of college preparatory academic courses as follows along with at least 100 hours of community service:

  • 4 English
  • 4 Mathematics (Algebra I level and above)
  • 3 Natural Science
  • 3 Social Science
  • 2 Foreign Language (sequential, in the same language)

If students have more credits than listed in any subject area, the Bright Futures Scholarship Program will count only the best semesters toward the GPA. However, you may use up to two additional credits from courses in the academic areas listed above and/or AP courses to raise the GPA.

Test Scores

Best combined score of 1170 SAT or best composite score of 26 ACT. The ACT composite score is the average of the best scores across the four subject area sections from any test sitting: English, Math, Reading and Science. Composite scores ending in 0.50 will be rounded up to the next whole number. The SAT is the best reading and math score from any sitting. Students may sit for either old or new versions of the SAT. Bright Futures will continue to use any combination of the two sections that will benefit the student.

  • The writing sections for both the SAT and ACT will not be used in the composite
  • Sections of the SAT or ACT from different test dates may be used to meet the test criteria
  • Test dates through June 30 of the senior year will be admissible

Health & Wellness, Business, & Computer Education Department

Department Philosophy

The Chaminade-Madonna Health & Wellness, Business, & Computer Education Department provides relevant, authentic, and real-life learning experiences for students. The mission of the department is to ensure that students acquire the knowledge and skills that will prepare them for post-secondary education and entry into the workplace. The department strives to help our students become informed consumers, effective workers and prepared citizens.

HOPE – Health Opportunities thru Physical Education (1.0 Credit) Grades 9-12

This course is a graduation requirement that will be equivalent to Personal Fitness and Life Management. Students that already took Personal Fitness or Life Management cannot register for this course.

The purpose of this course is to develop and enhance healthy behaviors that influence lifestyle choices and student health and fitness. The content should include, but not be limited to the following: apply fitness and health concepts, biomechanical and physiological principles, prevention and control of lifestyle diseases, risk factor assessments, includes chronic diseases, communicable and non- communicable diseases such as HIV/AIDs, other STDs, heart disease, diabetes, cancers, asthma, development of an individual wellness plan, responsible decision making, development of an individual nutrition plan, completion of a behavior change project, analyzing of skills related fitness, safety and injury prevention, safety education practices, analyzing consumer information and community resources, interpersonal communication – communication, relationships, sportsmanship, tobacco, alcohol, and other drug use and abuse – risk and protective factors, advocating for health and fitness promotion, technology application to facilitate health and fitness.

Weight Training 1 (.5 Credit) Grades 10-11

This course will satisfy additional physical education graduation requirement.

This semester course is designed to teach the student proper conditioning techniques; it includes weightlifting techniques on nautilus and free weight equipment. It will also teach proper aerobic conditioning activities. The student will learn the importance of a complete conditioning program which builds strength, endurance and flexibility.

$: A gym uniform is required.

Sports Medicine (.5 Credit) Grades 10 - 12

This course does not satisfy additional physical education graduation requirement.

This course will be entry level for sophomores, juniors, or seniors. The students will learn the fundamentals of athletic training and emergency care procedures. The purpose of this class is to learn how and when to care for injuries both in athletics and in the general population.

Team Sports (.5 Credit) Grades 10 - 12

This course will satisfy additional physical education graduation requirement.

This course will provide learning experiences that will lead to the development of basic skills in team sports and for the improvement/maintenance of personal fitness. The content will include, but not be limited to, knowledge and application skil ls, techniques, strategies, rules, and safety practices necessary to participate in selected team sports. Sports covered include, but are not limited to: flag football, soccer, volleyball, and basketball.

$: A gym uniform is required.

Honors Introduction to Business (.5 Credit) Grade 10-12

Prerequisite: A cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher.

This honors level course is designed to provide an introduction to business organization, management, and entrepreneurial principles. The content includes, but is not limited to, communication skills, various forms of business ownership and organizational structures, supervisory/management skills, leadership skills, human resources management activities, business ethics, and cultural diversity.

Business Leadership Skills (.5 Credit) Grades 10-12

This course teaches personal leadership skills, emphasizing servant leadership, problem solving, decision making, communication skills, group dynamics, time and stress management, public speaking, human relations, public relations, team building and other processes

Computer Applications 1 ( .5 Credit) Grades 9 - 12

This course is designed to familiarize students with computers and their applications. It will emphasize the use of computers and technology throughout their high school, college and future careers. Class content includes, but is not limited to, keyboarding basics, Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and iMovie. Coursework also includes activities that explore social and ethical issues related to computer use.

Honors Web Design (.5 Credit) Grades 10-12

Prerequisite: A cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher

This course introduces students to basic web design using HTML (Hypertext Markup Language) and CSS (Cascading Style Sheets). The course does not require any prior knowledge of HTML or web design. Throughout the course students are introduced to planning and designing effective web pages; implementing web pages by writing HTML and CSS code; enhancing web pages with the use of page layout techniques, text formatting, graphics, images, and multimedia; and producing a functional, multi-page website. Students should have a general background in using a computer, managing files, and a basic knowledge of the Internet. Students should also be able to navigate to and within a website using a web browser such as Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer, or Safari.

English Department

Department Philosophy

"Within a college preparatory framework, students of English will develop the ability to analyze and appreciate the written word in order to succeed both in college and in life. They will learn to read a wide array of texts closely, to think critically about their composition, and to write effectively so as to persuade a given audience and achieve a given purpose. They will also refine their skills in listening, speaking, and researching to ready them to become capable university students and independent life-long learners."

English I/9 (1.0 Credit)- Introduction to Literature & Composition

This course introduces students to the genres of poetry, drama, and prose. Students explore literature from a variety of cultures and periods while examining how literary works reflect cultural values. A Quarter 1 Writing Seminar aims to stress skills necessary for success in school and beyond. These skills are then reinforced throughout subsequent quarters/ courses. By the end of the course students will have developed a digital writing portfolio showcasing these skills.

English I/9 Honors (1.0 Credit) - Introduction to Literature & Composition

Prerequisite: Performance on the entrance exam.

This course introduces students to the genres of poetry, drama, and prose. Students explore literature from a variety of cultures and periods while examining themes reflective of the human condition. A Quarter 1 Writing Seminar aims to stress skills necessary for success in school and beyond. These skills are then reinforced throughout subsequent quarters/courses. By the end of the course students will have developed a digital writing portfolio showcasing these skills.

English II/10 (1.0 Credit) - Introduction to World Literature & Composition

Prerequisite: Completion of English I.

This course explores the tools that writers of the English language use to construct meaning in selections of poetry, prose, and drama from World Literature. A Quarter 1 Writing Seminar aims to stress skills necessary for success in school and beyond. Students are then challenged to forge and wield those same tools in their own significant pieces of narrative, expository, and argumentative writing. Continued development of a digital writing portfolio is required.

English II/10 Honors (1.0 Credit) – Introduction to World Literature & Composition

Prerequisite: An “A” in English I/teacher recommendation; an “A” or “B” in English I Honors/teacher recommendation.

This course is an examination of World Literature designed to challenge students’ writing and comprehension skills. Students are expected to read various pieces of literature and write numerous types of composition pieces. A Quarter 1 Writing Seminar aims to stress skills necessary for success in school and beyond. At the end of the course, students can continue into the Honors and AP track by exhibiting high quality work that is reflected in their writing and comprehension skills. Continued development of a digital writing portfolio is required.

English III/11 (1.0 Credit) - American Literature & Composition

Prerequisite: Completion of English II.

This course introduces students to the historical periods of American literature. Students examine poetry, drama, and prose and analyze how literary works reflect the characteristics of historical periods. The course stresses strong writing skills, from organized paragraphs to unified and coherent essays. During the first and second quarters, students compose and revise five paragraph essays that focus on mechanics, organization, style, and content. During the third quarter, students compose and revise six paragraph essays. During the fourth quarter, students are introduced to the composition of the research paper. Vocabulary skills are developed in preparation fo r standardized tests (such as the ACT and SAT), college, and professional life. Requirements include summer and outside reading of novels and other long works of nonfiction.

English III/11 Honors (1.0 Credit) - American Literature & Composition

Prerequisite: An “A” in English II/teacher recommendation; an “A” or “B” in English II Honors/teacher recommendation.

This course, offered for dual enrollment credit through St. Thomas University. It focuses on the grammar, composition, and literature that is taught in preparation for the college freshman level. Its purpose is to prepare students for the kinds of reading and writing they will have to do in college, and equip them with the communication and analytical skills required in today’s workforce. The coursework includes an in-depth study of rhetoric and the art of written communication and persuasion, as well as a study of American Literature from 1600 to today and the influences of different historical periods on literature. Continued development of a digital writing portfolio is required.

English III/11 (1.0 Credit) - Advanced Placement

Prerequisite: An “A” in English II Honors/satisfactory completion of a placement essay/teacher recommendation/500+ Verbal PSAT score.

This course, offered for dual enrollment credit through St. Thomas University. It focuses on the grammar, composition, and literature that is taught at the college freshman level. Its purpose is to prepare students for the kinds of reading and writing they will have to do in college, and equip them with the communication and analytical skills required in today’s workforce. The coursework includes an in-depth study of rhetoric and the art of written communication and persuasion, as well as specific preparation for the Advanced Placement English Language and Composition Exam. Continued development of a digital writing portfolio is required.

English IV/12 (1.0 Credit) – British Literature & Composition

Prerequisite: Completion of English III.

This course focuses on grammar and composition within the study of British Literature. Its purpose is to prepare students for the kinds of reading and writing they will have to do in college, and equip them with the communication and analytical skills required in today’s workforce. Continued development of a digital writing portfolio is required.

Honors English 4(1.0 Credit) Grade 12

Prerequisite: An "A" in English 3 and the recommendation of the teacher or an "A" or "B" in Honors English 3 and the recommendation of the teacher. PSAT scores are also used in the placement process.

This course explores the theme of the human search for meaning. Students analyze poetry, drama, and prose from world literature that reflects this theme. Writing is stressed through the school-wide writing program. Students compose and revise longer essays and papers that focus on mechanics, organization, style, and content. Vocabulary skills are developed in preparation for college and life. Requirements include summer and outside reading of novels.

English IV/12 Honors (1.0 Credit)-British Literature & Composition

Prerequisite: An “A” in English III/teacher recommendation; an “A” or “B” in English III Honors/teacher recommendation.

This course, offered for dual enrollment credit through St. Thomas University, explores man’s search for meaning through representative selections of poetry, prose, and drama from World Literature. Students are also challenged to introduce their own voices into this discourse with a variety of expository and argumentative essays incorporating significant research. Continued development of a digital writing portfolio is required.

English IV/12 Advanced Placement (1.0 Credit)- English Literature and Composition

Prerequisite: An “A” in English III Honors/satisfactory completion of a placement essay/teacher recommendation/500+ Verbal PSAT score.

This course, offered for dual enrollment credit through St. Thomas University, analyzes the literary techniques employed by authors of poetry, prose, and drama since 1558. Students are challenged to read incisively, think critically, and write persuasively in preparation for the Advanced Placement Literature and Comprehension Exam. Continued development of a digital writing portfolio is required.

Reading 9: Reading is a required semester course for selected students based on their entrance exam scores. Those who take the course will strive to improve their reading skills as preparation for both the high school curriculum and college entrance tests. Students will participate in daily practice focused on vocabulary development, reading and visual comprehension skills, advanced reading skills, and learned skills application.

Foreign Language Department

Department Philosophy

Through the study of foreign languages, we strive to develop each student’s knowledge of non-English language, literature, and culture. We also teach the methods of understanding and interpreting texts, including methods of critical thinking.

Italian Language

Italian 1 (1.0 Credit) Grades 11-12

Prerequisites: Students must have 2 years of a foreign language (This is an elective course and it’s not available as the foreign language options for 9-10th graders)

This course provides a foundation in conversation, pronunciation and oral drill in conjunction with grammatical structure and an introduction to simple composition. The cultural setting for this language is also studied.

French Language

French 1 (1.0 Credit) Grades 9-11

In the first year of French the students learn basic vocabulary and structures. There is an emphasis on correct pronunciation, listening comprehension and oral work. Topics include greetings, family, homes, food, sports, and songs. Grammar is introduced in context and practiced with oral and written exercises. Culture capsules include a treatment of many countries where French is spoken as well as the life of young people. The students compose and present short presentations and read short passages in French.

French 2 (1.0 Credit) Grades 9-12

Prerequisite: Completion of French 1.

This course expands all phases of French I. The cultural excerpts discuss customs and historical events. Grammatical structures are introduced in context and reinforced through oral and written drills. The students master most tenses in the indicative mood. They compose short compositions and deliver oral presentations in French.

Honors French 3 (1.0 Credit) Grades 10-12

Prerequisite: A grade of "C” or higher in French 2 and the recommendation of the teacher.

This course reinforces and continues all skills acquired in the first two years of French. The grammar study includes all tenses in the language. The reading selections are excerpts of contemporary French literature. Compositions and discussions are in French and based upon covered readings.

Honors French 4 (1.0 Credit) Grades 11-12

Prerequisite: An "A" or "B" in Honors French 3 and the recommendation of the teacher.

All language skills are enhanced. Students are introduced to important periods and events of French history and literature. The readings include excerpts, short stories and essays of famous authors who characterize each period. Students comment and write essays related to these readings. New vocabulary is derived from the literary works and advanced grammar study is based upon the students' skills and needs.

$: Students are eligible to take the Advanced Placement Exam offered in May

Spanish Language

Spanish 1 (1.0 Credit) Grades 9-11

In the first year of Spanish, students learn basic vocabulary and structure. Topics include greetings, descriptions, family, the house, food, and sports. The culture capsules contrast American life with that in Hispanic countries. Grammar is introduced in context and practiced through oral and written exercises. Emphasis is placed on developing all of the four basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing.

Honors Spanish 1(1.0 Credit) Grades 9-11

Prerequisite: Performance on Entrance Exam

In the first year of Spanish the students learn basic vocabulary and structures. Topics include greetings, descriptions, family, the house, food, and sports. The culture capsules contrast American life with that in Hispanic countries. Grammar is introduced in context and practiced through oral and written exercises. Emphasis is placed on developing all of the four basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. This course covers additional content at an advanced level.

Spanish 2 (1.0 Credit) Grades 9-12

Prerequisite: Completion of Spanish 1.

This course expands all phases of Spanish 1. The cultural excerpts discuss geography, famous people, and historical events as well as daily life. The vocabulary is greatly expanded as well as grammatical concepts and additional tenses in the indicative mood. The students are expected to be more conversant at this level and have increased their reading and writing skills.

Honors Spanish 2 (1.0 Credit) Grades 9-12

Prerequisite: An "A" in Spanish 1 or an "A" or "B" in Honors Spanish 1 and teacher recommendation.

This course expands all phases of Spanish 1. The cultural excerpts discuss geography, famous people, and historical events as well as daily life. The vocabulary is greatly expanded as well as grammatical concepts and additional tenses in the indicative mood. The students are expected to be more conversant at this level and have increased their reading and writing skills. This course covers additional content at an advanced level.

Spanish 3 (1.0 Credit) Grades 10-12

Prerequisite: Completion of Spanish 2. A“C” or higher in Spanish 2 is recommended.

Listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills are all enhanced in this course. Grammar includes all tenses in the language. The reading selections include excerpts, short stories, poems and plays by recognized Spanish authors as well as cultural information. Compositions and oral presentations are required. Greater emphasis is placed on enhancing active conversation.

Honors Spanish 3 (1.0 Credit) Grades 10-12

Prerequisite: A “B” or higher in Honors Spanish 2 or Spanish 2 and the recommendation of the teacher.

Listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills are all enhanced in this course. Grammar includes all tenses in the language. The reading selections include excerpts, short stories, poems and plays by recognized Spanish authors as well as cultural information. Compositions and oral presentations are required. Greater emphasis is placed on active conversation. This course covers additional content at an advanced level.

Honors Spanish 4 (1.0 Credit) Grades 11-12

Prerequisite: An “A” or “B” in Honors Spanish 3 and the recommendation of the teacher.

In this course the students review previously learned grammar structures while gaining an in-depth understanding of complex syntax, as well as an advanced proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The reading selections are expanded works by authors of Spain and Latin America. Listening comprehension and speaking are important at this level as well as increased reading and writing in Spanish.

Qualified students are encouraged to sit for the Spanish Language Advanced Placement Exam offered in May.

Honors Spanish 5 (1.0 Credit) Grade 12

Prerequisite: A“B” or higher in Honors Spanish 4 and the recommendation of the teacher.

Honors Spanish 5 is an independent study program. The students work on improving all four language skills with emphasis on both conversation and written expression. The reading material includes college level works of renowned Spanish and Latin American authors.

Qualified students are encouraged to sit for the Spanish Literature Advanced Placement Exam offered in May.

Honors Español 1 (1.0 Credit) Grades 9-11

Prerequisite: Performance on the entrance exam.

This introductory course is designed for the student who can speak Spanish and understand when spoken to in Spanish. The course is taught in Spanish. The objective of the course is to introduce the student to the formal grammatical structures of the Spanish language, to teach the student reading and writing skills, and to enhance vocabulary. The student is introduced to Hispanic literature and culture, which provide the basis for class discussions, short readings and writing activities.

Honors Español 2 (1.0 Credit) Grades 9-12

Prerequisite: A “C” or higher in Honors Español 1 or performance on the entrance exam.

This course continues the study of formal grammar for the native speaker, and is taught in Spanish. The grammatical structures presented are more advanced in this course and more difficult literary works are introduced. The emphasis is on proper sentence construction and spelling in grammar exercises and compositions whose themes often stem from literary selections read in class. The students will be introduced to literature.

Honors Español 3 (1.0 Credit) Grades 10-12

Prerequisite: A “C” or higher in Honors Español 2 and the recommendation of the teacher.

This course is a continuation of Honors Español 2 and is taught in Spanish. All four language skills, speaking, listening, reading, and writing are enhanced at this level. The grammar includes all tenses in the language. The reading selections include multiple styles of writing, form short stories to poems and plays, by recognized Spanish authors. Compositions and oral presentations are required.

AP Spanish Language (1.0 Credit) Grades 11-12

Prerequisite: A “C” or higher in Honors Español 3 and a placement exam.

This course is designed for the native speaker who has demonstrated sufficient ability in all four language skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Emphasis will be placed on enhancing the student’s understanding of complex grammar structures and vocabulary through advanced literature in various styles. These literary works will be the basis for writing essays and conducting discussions using formal Spanish.

$: Students are eligible to take the Spanish Language Advanced Placement Exam offered in May.

AP Spanish Literature (1.0 Credit) Grade- 12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of AP Spanish Language and the recommendation of the teacher.

This course is for students with native-speaker proficiency who wish to pursue further study of Hispanic literature. This course aims to prepare students for the Advanced Placement Exam in Spanish literature, enabling them to understand lectures in Spanish, actively participate in literary discussions, perform close reading of Modern Hispanic literary texts in various genres and analyze the style and content of literary works through oral and written expression using appropriate terminology

$: Students are eligible to take the Spanish Literature Advanced Placement Exam offered in May.

Mathematics Department

Department Philosophy

The Mathematics Department at Chaminade-Madonna aims to instill a conceptual and procedural understanding of basic mathematics facts, principles, and methods. We recognize that individual students learn in different ways and provide a variety of course paths and learning experiences that will challenge and encourage students of different ability levels in their study of mathematics and their preparation for college and for life. We emphasize the appropriate use of technology throughout our curriculum. Ultimately we intend to develop mathematically powerful students by teaching them to think and reason logically, to communicate clearly and effectively, and to understand mathematical tools and techniques. We hope that our students learn to appreciate mathematics as a useful discipline to describe and interpret the world around us – and for its own intrinsic beauty.

Algebra 1 (1.0 Credit) Grade 9

The purpose of this course is to develop the algebraic concepts and processes that can be used to solve a variety of real-world and mathematical problems. The content will include, but not be limited to, the following: structure and properties of the real number system, including rational and irrational numbers-exponents, square roots, radicals, absolute value, and scientific notation-varied means for analyzing and expressing patterns, relations and functions, including words, tables, sequences, graphs and algebraic equations-variables, algebraic expressions, polynomials and systems of equations.

$: Required: Calculator TI 30 XII

Honors Algebra 1 (1.0 Credit) Grade 9

Prerequisite: Performance on the entrance exam.

The purpose of this course is to develop the algebraic concepts and processes that can be used to solve a variety of real-world and mathematical problems. The content should include, but not be limited to, the following: structure and properties of the real number system, including rational and irrational numbers-exponents, square roots, radicals, absolute value and scientific notation-varied means for analyzing and expressing patterns, relations , and functions, including tables, sequences, graphing and algebraic equations-variables, algebraic expressions, polynomials and operations with polynomials-coordinate geometry and graphing equations and inequalities-data analysis concepts and techniques including introductory statistics and probability-varied solution strategies, algebraic and graphic, for inequalities, linear and quadratic equations, and for systems of equations.

$ Required: Calculator TI 30 XII

Geometry (1.0 Credit) Grades 9 - 11

Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra 1.

The purpose of this course is to develop the geometric relationships and deductive strategies that can be used to solve a variety of real world and mathematical problems. The content will include, but not be limited, to the following: geometric constructions-terminology and fundamental properties of geometry- deductive and inductive reasoning and their application to formal and informal proof-formulas pertaining to the measurement of plane and solid figures-coordinate geometry and transformations on the coordinate plane-exploration of geometric relationships such as parallelism, perpendicularity, congruence and similarity-properties of circles-right triangle trigonometry. $ Required: Calculator TI 30 XII

Honors Geometry (1.0 Credit) Grades 9 - 10

Prerequisite: An “A” or “B” in Honors Algebra 1 and the recommendation of the teacher or an "A" in Algebra 1 and the recommendation of the teacher. PSAT scores are also used in the placement process.

The purpose of this course is to develop the geometric relationships and deductive strategies that can be used to solve a variety of real world and mathematical problems. The content will include, but not be limited to, the following: geometric constructions; terminology and fundamental properties of geometry; deductive and inductive reasoning and their application to formal and informal proof; formulas pertaining to the measurement of plane and solid figures; coordinate geometry and transformations on the coordinate plane; exploration of geometric relationships, such as parallelism, perpendicularity, congruence and similarity; properties of circles; right triangle trigonometry; and logic.

$ Required: Calculator TI 30 XII

Algebra 2 (1.0 Credit) Grades 9 - 12

Prerequisite: Completion of Geometry.

The purpose of this course is to continue the study of Algebra and to provide the foundation for applying algebraic skills to other mathematical and scientific fields. The content will include, but not be limited to, the following: structure and properties of the complex number system-arithmetic and geometric sequences and series-relations, functions and graphs extended to polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions-varied solution strategies for linear equations, including measures of central tendency and dispersion -probability, permutations and combinations.

$ Required: Calculator TI 30 XII

Honors Algebra 2 (1.0 Credit) Grades 9 - 11

Prerequisite: An “A” or “B” in Honors Algebra 1 and an “A” or “B” in Geometry or Honors Geometry and the recommendation of the teacher or an "A" in Algebra 1 and an “A” or “B” in Geometry or Honors Geometry and the recommendation of the teacher.

The purpose of this course is to continue the study of algebra and to provide the foundation for applying algebraic skills to other mathematical and scientific fields. The content will include, but not be limited to, the following: structure and properties of the complex number system-arithmetic and geometric sequences and series-relations, functions and graphs extended to polynomial, exponential and logarithmic functions-varied solution strategies for linear equations, inequalities, and systems of equations and inequalities-varied solution strategies, including the quadratic formula, for quadratic equations-conic sections and their applications-data analysis, including measures of central tendency and dispersion-probability, permutations, and combinations.

$ Required: Calculator TI 84+

Pre-Calculus (1.0 Credit) Grades 10-12

Prerequisite: An “A” or “B” in Algebra 2 and the recommendation of the teacher or a "C” in Honors Algebra 2 and the recommendation of the teacher.

The purpose of this course is to emphasize the study of functions and other skills necessary for the study of calculus. The content will include, but not be limited to, the following: polynomial, rational, exponential, inverse, logarithmic and circular functions-sequences and series-concepts of limits and continuity-vectors-conic sections-polar coordinate systems-symbolic logic-mathematical induction-matrix algebra-symbolic logic and set theory-probability and statistics. The study of circular functions will include, but not be limited to, graphing trigonometric functions, solving trigonometric identities and equations, and solving triangles.

$ Required: Calculator TI 84+

Honors Pre-Calculus (1.0 Credit) Grades 10 - 12

Prerequisite: An “A” or “B” in Honors Algebra 2 and the recommendation of the teacher or an "A" in Algebra 2 and the recommendation of the teacher.

The purpose of this course is to emphasize the study of functions and other skills necessary for the study of calculus. The content will include, but not be limited to, the following: polynomial, rational, exponential, inverse, and logarithmic and circular functions-sequences and series-concepts of limits and continuity-vectors-conic sections-polar coordinate systems-symbolic logic-mathematical induction-matrix algebra-symbolic logic and set theory-probability and statistics. The study of circular functions will include, but not be limited to, graphing trigonometric functions, and solving trigonometric identities and equations.

$ Required: Calculator TI 84+

Honors Calculus (1.0 Credit) Grades 11 – 12

Prerequisite: An “A” or “B” in Pre-Calculus and the recommendation of the teacher or a "C" or better in Honors Pre-Calculus and the recommendation of the teacher.

The purpose of this course is to enable students to develop knowledge and skills in calculus concepts while strengthening and extending concepts learned in previous mathematics courses. The content should include, but not be limited to, the following: functions, limits and continuity, derivatives and their applications, anti-derivatives, definite integrals and their applications.

$ Required: Calculator TI 84+

College Algebra (1.0 Credit) Grades 11-12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra 2.

This course introduces the student to the concept of functions and their graphs. Students will graph linear, quadratic, rational, exponential, logarithmic, radical power, and absolute value functions and transformations; perform operations on and compositions of functions; find the inverse of a function; apply the laws of logarithms to simplify expressions and solve equations; graph non-linear inequalities; solve related applications and modeling problems. $ Required: Calculator TI 84+

Advanced Placement Calculus AB (1.0 Credit) Grades 11 - 12

Prerequisite: An “A” or “B” in Honors Pre-Calculus and the recommendation of the teacher. The purpose of this course is to study algebraic and transcendental functions and the general theory and techniques of calculus. The content will include but not be limited to following of the content specified by the Advanced Placement Program. Students will receive 1-2 hours of study/homework every day.

$ Required: Calculator TI 84+

$: Students are eligible to take the Advanced Placement Exam in AP Calculus AB offered in May.

Advanced Placement Statistics (1.0 Credit) Grades 12

Prerequisite: An “A” or “B” in Honors Pre-Calculus, Honors Algebra 2 or AP Calculus and the recommendation of the teacher.

This course in statistics introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: (1) exploring data: describing patterns and departures from patterns (2) sampling and experimentation: planning and conducting a study (3) anticipating patterns: exploring random phenomena using probability

and simulation (4) statistical Inference: estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses.

$ Required: Calculator TI 84+

$: Students are eligible to take the Advanced Placement Exam in AP Statistics offered in May.

Science Department

Department Philosophy

The Chaminade-Madonna College Preparatory science department believes that an understanding of the scientific principles which govern our world are essential components of an educated adult and that an appreciation for the beauty and complexity of life, the earth, and the universe leads to a richer spiritual experience. We empower our students to gain a body of knowledge sufficient to understand issues of importance to their own health and well-being and to inform wise decision making as citizens. We also believe the study of science develops essential critical thinking skills that apply to all areas of life. The body of knowledge and critical thinking skills that our students gain through science education at Chaminade-Madonna College Preparatory prepare them for more advanced work in college and their future careers and apply to the challenges of working towards a better world.

Biology (1.0 Credit) Grade 9

This survey course of life and life processes at all levels of organization studies the development of cell theory, cell structures, taxonomy, cell biology, biochemistry, systems of the body, genetics, evolution, plants, and environmental studies. Laboratory activities and interactive digital media enhance and complement the classroom experience.

Honors Biology (1.0 Credit) Grade 9

Prerequisite: Performance on the entrance exam.

This entry level course covers, at a higher level, the major concepts of Biology including chemistry of living systems, cytology, taxonomy, comparative anatomy, plant studies, genetics and evolution. Laboratory activities and interactive digital media enhance the classroom experience and prepare the student for AP Biology. Selected outside readings will complement this accelerated course.

Physical Science - (1.0 Credit) Grade 10

Prerequisite: Completion of Biology

This course covers key topics in biology, chemistry and physics in preparation for further focus on any of these areas of modern science. Chemical topics will be investigation of matter, atomic structure, chemical reactions, acids and bases. Physics topics include Newton’s laws of motion, energy and momentum, gravity, and heat. Important ideas and the unifying concepts will be emphasized over mathematical computation. Laboratory experiences and Smart board technology will enhance understanding.

Chemistry (1.0 Credit) Grades 10-11

Prerequisite: An "A" or "B" in Biology or successful completion of Physical Science

This course in inorganic chemistry qualitatively and quantitatively studies the properties of the elements. The course covers concepts of chemistry including matter and energy, nomenclature, electronic configuration, bonding, molecular geometry, stoichiometry, balancing equations, gas laws, and solutions. The course curriculum is reinforced by classroom technology and laboratory studies that illustrate the principles of chemistry and safe laboratory techniques.

Honors Chemistry (1.0 Credit) Grades 10 - 11

Prerequisite: An "A" or "B" in Honors Biology or an "A" in Biology and the recommendation of the teacher

This is an in-depth one year course in inorganic chemistry and includes the following main concepts: matter and change, atomic structure, electrons in atom, the periodic table, ions and metallic bonding, covalent bonding, chemical names and formulas, chemical quantities, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, states of matter, behavior of gases, and solutions. Selected outside readings, classroom technology, and laboratory experiments compliment this accelerated course. Strong reading, analytical, and problem solving skills are required.

AP Biology (1.0 Credit) Grades 11 - 12

Prerequisite: An “A” or “B” in related science Honors course and the recommendation of the teacher. PSAT scores are also used in the placement process.

This advanced elective course in Biology will provide students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge and analytical skills necessary to successfully complete a first year university biology course, as well as to succeed on the AP examination. Coursework will focus on the major study areas of cellular theory, genetics, evolution, human anatomy and ecology. A molecular approach to the subject will be emphasized. Strong motivation, independent work habits and excellent reading skills required. Required labs complement classroom theory and are a necessary component to passing the AP exam.

$: Students will need to purchase an AP review book.

$: Students are eligible to take the Advanced Placement exam in Biology offered in May.

AP Chemistry (1.0 Credit) Grades 11-12

Prerequisite: An “A” in Honors Chemistry and the recommendation of the teacher.

This advanced elective course in chemistry provides students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical skills necessary to successfully complete a first year college chemistry course. The course covers atomic theory, chemical bonding, nuclear chemistry, reactions, stoichiometry, equilibrium, periodicity, gas laws, solutions, kinetics, and thermodynamics. Both a qualitative and quantitative approach to the subject will be emphasized. Required labs complement classroom theory and are a necessary component to passing the AP exam. Students will need to be available to schedule a few afternoon labs until 4:00 p.m. Strong motivation, independent work habits and excellent reading and analytical skills required. TI-30X IIS calculator required.

$: Students will need to purchase an AP review book.

$: Students are eligible to take the Advanced Placement exam in Chemistry offered in May.

Physics (1.0 Credit) Grades 11 - 12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of current science class and the recommendation of the teacher as well as a "C" or better in Algebra 2 or higher mathematics class.

This entry level course in physics covers the study of matter's interaction and change. The course will focus on Newtonian Mechanics and problem solving techniques. We will cover the main concepts of velocity, acceleration, force, energy, and electricity. Laboratory investigations will complement the coursework. Physics is strongly recommended for all students considering a medically-related field.

Honors Physics (1.0 Credit) Grades 11 - 12

Prerequisite: An “A” or “B” in current honors science course and the recommendation of the teacher or an "A" in current science course and the recommendation of the teacher and an “A” or “B” in Algebra 2 or higher mathematics course.

This one year course will explore, in an accelerated format, the following concepts: Newtonian mechanics, force, linear momentum, impulse, work, energy, power, simple circuitry, electricity and light. Selected outside readings will complement this accelerated course. Strong motivation and math skills required.

AP Physics 1 (1.0 Credit) Grades 11-12

Prerequisite: An “A” in Honors Physics and the recommendation of the teacher as well as an “A” or “B” in Algebra II. PSAT scores are also used in the placement process.

This course is designed to be equivalent to the first semester of an introductory college-level algebra-based physics course. This course will include student centered inquiry activities. Students will explore the concepts in kinematics, Newton’s law of motion, gravitational and circular motion, work, energy, power, and linear momentum, torque and rotational motion, simple harmonic motion, waves, and sound, electrostatic and simple electric circuits. Strong motivation, independent work habits and excellent reading skills required.

$: Students will need to purchase an AP review book.

$: Students are eligible to take the Advance d Placement exam in Physics offered in May.

Human Anatomy and Physiology (1.0 Credit) Grades 11 - 12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of current science class and the recommendation of the teacher.

This course covers the structural organization and physiology of the human body. Studies will focus on systems involved in support, movement, integration, coordination, processing, transport and reproduction. Animal dissections will be an integral part of the course. This is an excellent course for those considering pre-med. and related fields. Strong motivation and excellent reading skills required.

Honors Human Anatomy and Physiology (1.0 Credit) Grades 11 - 12

Prerequisite: An "A" in current regular science course or an “A” or “B” in current honors science course and the recommendation of the teacher.

This course will cover the structural organization and physiology of the human body at an accelerated and in-depth level. Animal dissections will be an integral part of the course. This is an excellent course for those considering pre-med. and related fields. Strong motivation and excellent reading skills required.

Honors Marine Science (1.0 Credit) Grades 11-12

Prerequisite: An "A" in current regular science course or an “A” or “B” in current honors science course and the recommendation of the teacher. Student must have at least a 3.0 GPA.

This course will cover major issues of oceanography and marine biology, which include the biology and ecology of marine species as well as the physics, geology, and chemistry of world’s oceans. Emphasis will be on the ecology, physiology, and behavior of organisms in south Florida marine ecosystems. Ecologically important issues such as climate change, extinction, genetic biodiversity, population dynamics, and habitat preservation of environments of special interest such as coral reefs, sea grass beds, mangroves, pelagic, benthic and intertidal communities will be covered. Terrestrial linkages will be identified through the ecology of South Florida’s terrestrial ecosystems including coastal savanna, Everglades, and hardwood hammocks. Information and questions on sustainability and conservation will be integrated throughout the course and students will be challenged to think critically about these pressing concerns.

Social Studies Department

Department Philosophy

The Social Sciences Department faculty of Chaminade-Madonna believes that this discipline is the study of humankind. This work enables each student to approach present day challenges with an informed mind.

Becoming aware of the environmental, political, legal, social and economic factors that shape the world, instills within each student a determination to become an active and influential participant in the global community.

World Geography (1.0 Credit) Grade 9

This course will examine a broad range of geographical perspectives covering all of the major regions of the world. Each region will be reviewed in a similar structure to illustrate the similarities and differences between each region. Specifically, the course will explore where each region is located along with its physical characteristics, including absolute and relative location, climate, and significant geographical features. The exploration will continue to explore each region from a cultural, economic, and political perspective, closely examining the human impact on each region from these perspectives as well as how human activities impact the environments of the region.

Honors World Geography (1.0 Credit) Grade 9

Prerequisite: Performance on the Entrance Exam for 9th graders.

This course will examine a broad range of geographical perspectives covering all of the major regions of the world. Each region will be reviewed in a similar structure to illustrate the similarities and differences between each region. Specifically, the course will explore where each region is located along with its physical characteristics, including absolute and relative location, climate, and significant geographical features. The exploration will continue to explore each region from a cultural, economic, and political perspective, closely examining the human impact on each region from these perspectives as well as how human activities impact the environments of the region. This honors-level course, by design, is more challenging than the general-level course, providing for more in-depth exploration of material, project development, and examinations.

AP Human Geography (1.0 Credit) Grade 9-12

Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Performance on the Entrance Exam for 9th graders. An “A” in current Honors Social Studies class or an “A” or “B” in current AP Social Studies class and the recommendation of the teacher.

This course is designed to help students develop a greater understanding of the evolution of different cultures in different places around the world. This understanding is advanced through a combination of selective factual knowledge and appropriate analytical skills. The course offers balanced coverage of different topics such as, but not limited to, language, religion, culture, and immigration.

$: Students will take the Advanced Placement in Human Geography offered in May.

World History (1.0 Credit) Grade 10

Prerequisite: Successful completion of World Geography

This survey course traces the development of civilizations throughout the world from prehistoric times through the 1700s. Students trace the similarities and differences in the development of major world civilizations as impacted by geography, politics, and economics.

Honors World History (1.0 Credit) Grade 10

Prerequisite: A 3.0 unweighted GPA and an “A” or “B” in Honors World Geography, an “A” in World Geography, or a “C” in AP Human Geography with teacher recommendation.

This survey course traces the development of civilizations throughout the world from the prehistoric age through the 1700s. Students explore the similarities and differences in the development of major world civilizations as impacted by geography, politics, and economics.

This honors-level course, by design, is more challenging than the general-level course, providing for more in-depth exploration of material, project development, and examinations.

AP World History (1.0 Credit) Grade 10 (open to 10th, 11th and 12th graders as an elective)

Prerequisite: 3.5 unweighted GPA, an “A” or “B” in AP Human Geography or an “A” in Honors World Geography and the recommendation of the teacher.

This course develops greater understanding of the evolution of global processes and contacts in different types of human societies. This understanding is advanced through a combination of selective factual knowledge and appropriate analytical skills. The course offers balanced global coverage, with Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Oceania all represented.

$: Students are eligible to take the Advanced Placement Exam in World History offered in May.

United States History (1.0 Credit) Grade 11

Prerequisite: Completion of World Geography.

This survey course covers the American experience from colonization to the present. Students study the ideals upon which the United States was founded and examines the political realities which often conflict with those ideals. Students will develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of an informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence to support those conclusions.

Honors United States History (1.0 Credit) Grade 11

Prerequisite: 3.0 unweighted GPA and an “A” or “B” in Honors World Geography, an “A” in World Geography, or a “C” or better in AP World History with teacher recommendation.

The Honors course in United States History is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and primary source documents in United States history. The course prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses.

AP United States History (1.0 Credit) Grade 11

Prerequisite: 3.5 unweighted GPA, an “A” or “B” in AP World History or “A” in Honors World Geography with teacher recommendation.

The Advanced Placement course in United States History is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and primary source documents in United States history. The course prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. Students learn to assess historical artifacts- their relevance to a given interpretive problem, their reliability, and their importance - and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. Students will argue clearly and concisely. This course requires writing essays in preparation for the Advanced Placement Exam.

$: Students are eligible to take the Advanced Placement Exam in United States History offered in May.

American Government (.5 Credit) Grade 12 (Linked with Economics.)

Prerequisite: Completion of United States History.

This course develops student knowledge of American government, emphasizing the Constitution, the amendments, and the rights/responsibilities of citizens. Students receive a background in the foundation, institutions, decisions, and laws that govern America in the 21st century.

Economics (.5 Credit) Grade 12 (Linked with American Government.)

Prerequisite: Completion of United States History.

Economics is primarily studied from the free enterprise perspective. Students receive a thorough grounding in economic theory, as well as practical examples of entrepreneurship in society. Students will study the role of government in the economy and the impact of governmental decision-making. Additional course materials cover personal financial readiness in the 21st century.

Honors American Government (.5 Credit) Grade 12 (Linked with Honors Economics.)

Prerequisite: 3.0 unweighted GPA and an “A” or “B” in Honors United States History or an "A" in United States History or a “C” or better in AP US History with teacher recommendation..

This course develops student knowledge of American government, emphasizing the Constitution, the amendments, and the rights/responsibilities of citizens. Students receive a background in the foundation, institutions, decisions, and laws that govern America in the 21st century.

Honors Economics (.5 Credit) Grade 12 (Linked with Honors American Government.)

Prerequisite: 3.0 unweighted GPA and an “A” or “B” in Honors United States History or an "A" in United States History or a “C” or better in AP US History with teacher recommendation..

Economics is primarily studied from the free enterprise perspective. Students receive a thorough grounding in economic theory, as well as practical examples of entrepreneurship in society. Students will study the role of the government in the economy and the impact of governmental decision-making. Additional course materials cover personal financial readiness in the 21st century.

AP American Government/ Politics (.5 Credit) Grade 12 (Linked with AP Economics.)

Prerequisite: 3.5 unweighted GPA, an “A” or “B” in AP U.S. History or an "A" in Honors U.S History with teacher recommendation.

The AP American Government and Politics course prepares students for the College Board exam. This is a college level course which emphasizes the roles and functions of the federal government. Students will study the evolution of the national powers to include Supreme Court case law, federal budget development, and the roles of special interest groups.

$: Students are eligible to take the Advanced Placement Exam in American Government and Politics offered in May. A review book is required.

AP Economics (.5 Credit) Grade 12 (Linked with AP American Government.)

Prerequisite: 3.5 unweighted GPA, an “A” or “B” in AP United States History or an "A" in Honors United States History with teacher recommendation.

The Advanced Placement course in Economics emphasizes the principles of macroeconomics and their application to the American economic system. The course places demands on students that are equivalent to introductory college-level courses.

$: Students are eligible to take the Advanced Placement Exam in Macroeconomics offered in May. A review book is required.

Introduction to Psychology (.5 Credit) Grades11 - 12

Introduction to Psychology involves the study of the basic foundations and applications of psychology. Areas of study include: biology and behavior, perception, learning, emotions, personality, abnormal behavior and maintaining mental health.

Introduction to Sociology (.5 Credit) Grades 11-12

This course introduces students to social science. Students will learn methods and strategies and apply them in examining the contribution of Sociology to the understanding of social issues. The curriculum will include but is not limited to examining cultural transmission, understanding social status, exploring group behaviors and other sociological phenomena.

Theology Department

Department Philosophy

“Our mission in the Theology Department is to create an understanding in our students of the basics of Catholic faith and history, through an exploration of scripture, doctrine and tradition, always remaining true to Gospel values and the Church’ Magisterium, while also being accepting of students where they are in their faith journey."

Theology 9: Introduction to Catholicism and Sacraments (1.0 Credit) Grade 9

The first semester of this course introduces students to the mystery of Jesus Christ, the living Word of God, and the Second Person of the Blessed Trinity. Students will understand that Jesus Christ is the ultimate Revelation to us from God. In learning about who he is, the students will also learn who he calls them to be. In the second semester, this course helps the students understand that they can encounter Christ today in a full and real way in and through the sacraments, and to learn how they may encounter Christ throughout life.

Theology 10: Old and New Testaments (1.0 Credit) Grade 10

This course will give students a general knowledge and appreciation of the Sacred Scriptures. They will learn about the Bible, authored by God through Inspiration and its value to people throughout the world. They will learn to read and interpret the Bible and the books included in each section. The students will learn about the Gospels, where they may grow to know and love Jesus Christ more personally.

Theology 11: Christian Ethics and Social Justice (1.0 Credit) Grade 11

The first semester focuses on helping the students understand that it is through Christ that they can fully live out God’s plans for their lives. Students learn the moral concepts and precepts that govern the lives of Christ’s disciples. The second semester introduces the students to the Church’s social teaching. Students learn how Christ’s concern for others, especially the poor and needy is present today in the Church’s social teaching and mission.

Theology 12: Christian Commitment and Church History (1.0 Credit) Grade 12

The first semester is concerned with helping students understand the vocation s of life: how Christ calls us to live. Students will learn how all vocations are similar and how they differ. The course is structured around married life, single life, priestly life, and consecrated life. The second semester provides the students with a general knowledge of Church’s history form apostolic times to present. The students will learn about the Church’s 2,000 years of history and about how the Church is led and governed by the successors of the Apostles.

Fine Arts Department

Department Philosophy

The Fine Arts Department at Chaminade-Madonna College Preparatory believes that all students deserve access to the arts through creation, performance and study. To be successful in the twenty-first century requires that our students sharpen their skills of observation and critical thinking. They must also cultivate visual literacy skills and develop a range of means for self-expression. The arts offer a universal language, encompassing all forms of communication that enable students to express a variety of viewpoints and ideas through the visual arts, music, dance and drama. Arts education helps students develop the ability to think clearly, critically and creatively. Through the arts, students also demonstrate and deepen their understanding of basic knowledge and skills. Solving problems, communicating, using technology, working in teams are just a few of the skills developed by an arts education.

Art

2D/Art 1 (.5 Credit) Grades 9-12

This is an introductory course incorporating the media and techniques used to create a variety of two-dimensional (2-D) artworks with an emphasis on the fundamental elements of art: line, shape, color and form with a focus on color and perspective. Students practice, sketch, and manipulate the structural elements of art to improve mark making and/or the organizational principles of design in a composition from observation, research, and/or imagination. Through the critique process, students evaluate and respond to their own work and that of their peers. This course incorporates hands-on activities with the use of variety art materials.

2D/Art 2 (.5 Credit) Grades 10-12

Prerequisite: 2D/Art 1

This is a continuation of 2D/Art1 in which students develop and refine technical skills and create 2-D compositions with a variety of media in drawing and painting with more of a focus on design. Students practice, sketch, manipulate, and refine the structural elements of art to improve mark-making and/or the organizational principles of design in a composition from observation, research, and/or imagination. Through the critique process, students evaluate and respond to their own work and that of their peers. This course incorporates hands-on activities with the use of a variety of art materials.

Drawing 1 (.5 Credit) Grades 11-12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of 2D/Art 1 or 2D/Art 2and teacher’s recommendation

This is an intermediate course in which students experiment with the media and techniques used to create a variety of two-dimensional (2-D) artworks through the development of skills focusing on drawing and incorporating painting, printmaking, and design. Students practice, sketch, and manipulate the structural elements of art to improve mark making and/or the organizational principles of design in a composition from observation, research, and/or imagination. Through the critique process, students evaluate and respond to their own work and that of their peers. This course incorporates hands-on activities with the use of a variety of art materials.

Painting 1 (.5 Credit) Grades 11-12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of 2D/Art 1 or 2D Art 2 and teacher’s recommendation

This is an intermediate course which students experiment and refine the media and techniques used to create a variety of two-dimensional (2-D) artworks through the development of skills focusing on painting and incorporating drawing, printmaking and design. Students practice, and manipulate the structural elements of art to improve mark making and/or the organizational principles of design in a composition from observation, research, and/or imagination. Through the critique process, students evaluate and respond to their own work and that of their peers. This course incorporates hands-on activities with the use of a variety of art materials.

Ceramics 1 (.5 Credit) Grades 10 - 12

Prerequisite: successful completion of 2D/Art1

Ceramics 1 is an introductory course in which students will be exposed to the medium of clay, its properties, vocabulary, and design possibilities. Students are expected to complete the course with a thorough understanding of hand building techniques, clay types, textural applications, glazing and firing techniques in the kiln. Sculpture and wheel throwing are also introduced in the second part of the semester.

Ceramics 2 (.5 Credit) Grades 11-12

Prerequisite: Ceramics I

Ceramics 2 is for the more advanced ceramics student. It is a course in which students will continue to work with the medium of clay, its properties, vocabulary, and design possibilities. Students are expected to complete the course with a thorough understanding of hand building techniques, clay types, textural applications, glazing and firing techniques in the kiln. Sculpture and wheel throwing are also part of the course. Mosaic glass and tile media will be introduced.

AP Studio Art: Advanced Drawing & Painting (1.0 Credit) Grade 12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Drawing 1 and Painting 1 and the teacher’s recommendation. Instructor’s signature required

This is an advanced visual arts course intended for students who wish to pursue serious studies in the arts. It requires highly motivated students who have had previous successful experience in art courses and who are willing to devote considerable time and effort to the study of the different styles, techniques and media of art and to their own development of higher level skills.

Students will complete an impressive portfolio of art work and submit to the AP College Board.

Music

Music Appreciation (.5 Credit) Grades 9 - 12

Students will learn about the relationship between music and society in different time periods. This will be done through listening, discussion, as well as learning the basics of music. This course is designed for the student who has a genuine interest in music, but doesn't necessarily want to learn how to perform on an instrument. This course will also prepare students for college music appreciation courses which are required by many universities.

Jazz Ensemble 1 - 3(1.0 Credit) Grades 9 - 12

Prerequisite: Student must have prior knowledge of music performance.

This course is designed to allow experienced musicians to perform music in the jazz idiom. Emphasis will be placed on rock, swing, and Latin styles. Instrumentation includes all wind instruments, drum set, percussion, piano, guitar, and electric bass.

Piano (.5 Credit) Grades 9-12

This is an introductory piano course for students with little or no prior keyboard study. It emphasizes development of basic keyboard skills, music reading, and conceptual understanding pertinent to early level study. It also includes introduction to basic theory, keyboard technique, and basic keyboard repertoire.

Theater and Media Arts

Drama & Theatre (.5 Credit) Grades 9 - 12

This introductory course provides in-depth experiences in the study and practice of theatrical arts and related literature. Course work includes the study of theatre history from Ancient Greece to Broadway through the analysis of several period plays. Performance work will include an introduction to the fundamentals of acting through monologues, scene work, character and play analysis, vocal and movement training, and improvisation. An introduction to play production will include hands-on education in scenery construction, costuming, make-up, lighting and sound design. Field trips will be required as part of the curriculum.

Musical Theatre1-4 (1.0 Credit) Grades 9-12

This course examines the development of musical theatre from its beginning to the contemporary musical through academic study and practical hands on activities. The style and periods of musical theatre development are also examined through listening, singing, and presentation of material. The students are expected to be involved in some capacity in the staging of the school’s musical production. Audition material and ensemble work is incorporated into the course. The student will gain knowledge regarding the history of Musical Theatre and will gain basic knowledge of understanding vocal technique, a foundation in acting and the experience of having staged a musical production.

Cinematography 1(.5 Credit) Grades 11 - 12

This course will introduce the student to the evolution of filmmaking and its place in society. The films chosen for analysis may be of a particular genre, a body of work by a particular director or actor, possess a particular theme, or survey many different subjects and styles. The student will be asked to analyze and critique each film in both oral and written expression. Students will develop their skills of critiquing and forming opinions on the films to be screened.

Cinematography 2 (.5 Credit) Grades 11 - 12

Prerequisite: Completion of Cinematography 1

This course aims to sharpen appreciation of film and literary fiction by studying the differences and similarities between the ways that filmed narratives and written narratives tell their story. To this end we shall digest a modest amount of theory about narrative in general and how it works and view films and works of fiction in tandem. Each film will be paired with a work of literary merit which either deals with similar thematic materials and narrative situations, or else employs a technique of presentation that directly corresponds to the technique employed by the film with which it is paired. The student will be asked to analyze and critique each film in both oral and written expression. The student will develop critical and analytical skills to intelligently appreciate a film style.

Public Speaking (.5 Credit) Grades 11 - 12

This course enables students to develop fundamental skills in formal and informal oral communication. The content of this course includes forms of oral communication, techniques of public speaking, research, organization and writing for public speaking, and analysis of public speaking.

Television Production 1 (1.0 Credit) Grades 10 - 12.

This course is designed to allow the student to explore the medium of television. The history of television will be covered to give a perspective on the impact that television has made on our lives. The student will then learn the production elements of TV using technical vocabulary, operating video equipment, and writing copy for video pieces produced in class. The scope of this course will also include students on special assignments such as covering sporting events, the performing arts, and school functions.

Television Production 2 (1.0 Credit) Grades 11 - 12

Prerequisite: Completion of Television Production I.

Students successfully completing Television Production I may take this course. These students will be assigned special projects designed to enhance the skills that they learned in Television Production I.

Advanced Television Production (1.0 Credit) Grade -12

Prerequisite: Completion of Television Production II.

Students will be assigned advanced projects in filming and editing.

Dance

Beginning Dance (.5 Credit)

This course is designed to give beginning dance students a basic history of dance as well as technique and dance movements in all mediums, particularly on jazz and ballet.

* $: Dance shoes required.

Intermediate Dance (.5 Credit)

Prerequisite: Completion of Beginning Dance and signature of the instructor.

This course will give intermediate dance students a continuing knowledge of jazz and ballet dance. Students will learn dance combinations and dances at the intermediate level.

* $: Dance shoes required

Advanced Dance (.5 Credit)

Prerequisite: Completion of intermediate dance or signature of the dance instructor.

This course will move at a faster pace than the intermediate technique level. Every four weeks, a new style of dance such as jazz, contemporary, hip-hop and ballet will be introduced and a minute routine will be taught and staged giving students an opportunity to develop their technique, performance skills and creative expressions.

$: Dance shoes required.

Dance Choreography (.5 Credit) Grades

Prerequisite: Completion of Intermediate Dance and signature of the instructor.

This course introduces students to the principles and practices of creating dance choreography as a form of human expression. Methods of learning will include guided improvisations, small group presentations, written assignments, performance viewings, and class discussion.

Special Programs

Learning Center1-4 (1.0 Credit) Grades 9-12

The Learning Center provides resource support for students who have academic learning disabilities which have been diagnosed by an independent psychologist. Students in this program are expected to go on to college, but require some type of additional support or modification to perform at their potential. The Learning Center will focus on making reasonable adjustments to help students succeed in our mainstream college preparatory curriculum during the regular school day. Students are seen in small groups.

Under the direction of Ms. Angela Canosa, C-M Art students drew portraits of Syrian refugees. The artwork was delivered to the kids in Syria. Watch the video, to see how the artwork brought to Syria, made a difference in their lives.
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